The Suffrage Plaque

Virtual Visit: Object Stories - Suffrage Memorial Tablet

Discover the story behind the Suffrage Memorial Tablet at the New York State Capitol.
Virtual Visit: Object Stories - Suffrage Memorial Tablet
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Virtual Visit: Object Stories - Suffrage Memorial Tablet

Discover the story behind the Suffrage Memorial Tablet at the New York State Capitol.

Fun Facts

83 Women's Names Listed

1 Male Name Listed
100 Years Since the 19th Amendment

Dedicated on November 22, 1931
Mary Anne Krupsak became New York’s 1st female Lt. Governor

Four women have been NYS Lt. Governors.
Trivia

 

By how much (percentage) did the suffrage vote pass in New York?
In 1917, 53.92% of voters voted Yes but 46.08% voted No.

How often did women lobby for the right to vote in the New York State Capitol?
Women lobbied for the right to vote in Albany at the New York State Capitol from 1854 until 1917.

How was a woman’s name chosen for the Memorial Tablet?
The majority of the 84 names listed on the plaque were involved with fundraising for the Suffrage Memorial Tablet.

Who were Harriet and James Laidlaw?
Harriet Laidlaw organized for women’s right to vote and became the first woman elected to the board of directors of Standard and Poor’s. Her husband, James Laidlaw was president of the Men’s League for Women Suffrage and the only man with a name listed on the Suffrage Memorial Tablet.

When was the first female legislator elected?
It did not take very long to have the first female legislator after gaining the right to vote in New York. In 1919, Ida Sammis (Suffolk County, 2nd District) was elected by winning every town in her district.

If Lieutenant Governor Krupsak was the first female to serve in the role, how many female Lieutenant Governors have there been currently?
Including our current Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hocul, there have been four female Lieutenant Governors in New York. 

Who was the first woman in NYS to officially cast a vote?
In January 1918, Florence B. Chauncey from Central New York was the first woman to exercise her right to vote.